Author: Selasi Kuwornu

Mental Health and Criminal Law in Ghana

June 27, 2019

Mental health issues have dominated global health conversations over the years, mainly due to the increasing rates of suicide, depression and substance abuse, especially among the youth. Mental health encompasses the emotional and psychological wellbeing of a person. In Ghanaian criminal legislation, there are offences that border on the affected mental health of accused persons at […]

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The Implications of Lost or Missing Record of Proceedings

May 27, 2019

In the Supreme Court case of Jones Bonuah @ Eric Annor Blay v The Republic, the appellant appealed against (a) his conviction for robbery and (b) the decision of the Court of Appeal dismissing his appeal before them on grounds, among others that, the record of appeal from the trial High Court produced by the […]

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Powers of The Court Over Unmoved Applications

April 15, 2019

The supreme court has stressed that nothing prevents a court from electing to hear and decide on its merit a motion that has not been moved. In The Republic v Court of Appeal, Ex Parte: Eastern Alloys Company Limited[1], the applicant invoked the supervisory jurisdiction of the Supreme Court seeking both certiorari and mandamus to issue against […]

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GES, the Law and the Ban on ​Corporal Punishment

March 11, 2019

The Ghana Education Service (GES) in 2017 officially banned all forms of corporal punishment of children in schools in Ghana as part of efforts aimed at promoting a safe and protective learning environment for children.[1]The GES directed in January 2019 that a Positive Discipline Toolkit which gives alternatives to corporal punishments be adopted by all […]

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When Changing Your Mind Means Nothing

February 11, 2019

It has been said that only a fool never changes his mind. However, in our criminal jurisprudence, setting certain actions in motion without completing them may constitute an offence regardless of the change of mind. These offences are referred to as inchoate offences. This means that a full-blown offence does not need to have been […]

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Finders Not Keepers: The Ownership of Minerals in Ghana

January 24, 2019

Consider a scenario where you discover a gold nugget while digging your land for planting. Section 111 of the Minerals and Mining Act, 2006 (Act 703) defines “mineral” as a substance in solid or liquid form that occurs naturally in or on the earth, or on or under the seabed, formed by or subject to geological […]

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On the Constitutionality of the Presumption Of Advancement In Ghana

January 14, 2019

The law sometimes works in mysterious ways. And its principles are sometimes clearly out of date and out of touch with current realities. One of such principles is the presumption of advancement. The presumption of advancement means that the law presumes that the transfer of property to a recipient or the purchase of property in […]

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Non-Custodial Sentences in Ghana

December 10, 2018

In recent times, attention has been drawn to the challenges facing prison facilities in Ghana, especially to the issue of congestion. This has triggered a myriad of reactions and calls for noncustodial sentences for minor offences and misdemeanours in order to decongest the prisons. A noncustodial sentence is a punishment given by a court of […]

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Recent Developments in Criminal Procedure in Ghana

November 29, 2018

On 7th June 2018, the Supreme Court in the The Republic v Eugene Baffoe-Bonnie and 4 Others (the NCA case) held that on a true and proper interpretation of article 19 (2) (e) and (g) of the 1992 Constitution, an accused person had the right to be given adequate time and facilities for the preparation […]

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